KOKOROKO Drops Debut Video

KOKOROKO has just dropped its first video to compliment debut album Could We Be More; one that I find super dreamy and easy to either drift off in or find peace of mind to focus (though the first does sometimes win the day when it’s the latter I’m after, it should be said).

The video combines three of the albums songs—’Ewà Inú’; ‘Home’; ‘Age of Ascent’—and given the vibes it creates for me, I was intrigued to find out how the band had chosen to represent the music visually.

Stunningly, and contrary to my thoughts, somewhat tumultuously, by showing various aspects of life in the quite incredible Makoko, an area of Lagos, Nigeria, often called Africa’s Venice.

Makoko Floating School, 2016, via Public Delivery (.org)

makoko-floating-school-2016-makoko-lagos-nigeria-800x571-1

The video shows a rich tapestry, a place vibrant with lives functioning just as they might anywhere; though here there is a deep tenacity never before seen in any footage associated with the European counterpart.

According to its Wikipedia page:

‘In July 2012, Lagos State government under the governorship of Babatunde Fashola ordered that the stilts on the Iwaya/Makoko waterfront be demolished and dozens of stilts were demolished within 72 hours of notice to the residents. Nearly 3,000 people lost their homes to the demolition exercise.’

And while it might seem the threat has abated with progress at the school after it collapsed in 2016 (with no injuries) discussed in the link about it above, an article dated May 2022 by the International Centre for Investigative Reporting suggests things have regressed:

‘RESIDENTS of Makoko, Oko-Agbon and Sogunro in the Lagos Mainland Local Government, Lagos State, have resisted the planned demolition of their communities, allegedly by the state government through an estate developer.’

This compelling video was directed by Akinola Davies Jr.; a full list of all involved is available on the YouTube page.

KOKOROKO

Thanks for reading 🙂

N. P. Ryan

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